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The Edge of The Knife

 


The Edge of the Knife

Description:

This is the fourth book in the five book saga of: Dean and Egan, the Story of Two families. This story covers pre-World War II and post-World War II. There is no re-invention of the wheel here, nothing about the internal battles along the Rhone, the Rhine, or the bombings that devastate communities and lives.

It's a complete disconnect, for the most part, of the overview of the war. However, you do get a picture of the damage done to people on both sides of this conflict. Though, there is little sympathy for the Germans who "nefer saw a Nazi" nor did they "nefer knew a Nazi" or "I vas not a Nazi." It does recognize there were some, however, who didn't stay with "the cause" for the whole violent chapter in history.

The end is somewhat predictable, ie., the bad guy loses. However, once more, as with the others, who and how are the surprises here.

Review:

When I first read Olin's books, I was impressed with his research. He's obviously gone to great lengths to make sure the words and the scenarios are correct. I like his style.

James Tarkington, artist



Description:

This is the fourth book in the five book saga of: Dean and Egan, the Story of Two families. This story covers pre-World War II and post-World War II. There is no re-invention of the wheel here, nothing about the internal battles along the Rhone, the Rhine, or the bombings that devastate communities and lives.

It’s a complete disconnect, for the most part, of the overview of the war. However, you do get a picture of the damage done to people on both sides of this conflict. Though, there is little sympathy for the Germans who "nefer saw a Nazi" nor did they "nefer knew a Nazi" or "I vas not a Nazi." It does recognize there were some, however, who didn’t stay with "the cause" for the whole violent chapter in history.

The end is somewhat predictable, ie., the bad guy loses. However, once more, as with the others, who and how are the surprises here.


Publisher's opinion:

When I first read Olin’s books, I was impressed with his research. He’s obviously gone to great lengths to make sure the words and the scenarios are correct. I like his style. — James Tarkington, artist